UGA-165 Graphics Adapter Now $49.95

We’re happy to announce that we’ve been able to lower the everyday price of the Plugable UGA-165 USB 2.0 graphics adapter by $5 to $49.95. This price drop is made possible thanks to our loyal customers. Because of your growing demand for our products, we were able to manufacture a larger lot of UGA-165s (http://plugable.com/products/uga-165) at a lower cost than in the past, so we’re passing our increased savings on to you.

If you’re considering a USB graphics adapter to add another monitor to your system, the UGA-165 is a powerful product that works on Windows and Mac OS X with VGA, DVI, and HDMI monitors at resolutions up to 1920 x 1080 or 1600 x 1200 (widescreen). Its DisplayLink DL-165 chipset is nearly identical to the DL-195 chipset in the UGA-2K-A (http://pugable.com/products/uga-2k-a) except that the UGA-2K-A  can support resolutions up to 2048×1152 or 1920×1200 (widescreen).

Unless you have a display on which the optimal resolution is in the UGA-2K-A’s higher range, save some money and go with the UGA-165. You won’t sacrifice any other functionality. Both adapters use the same DisplayLink driver (http://plugable.com/products/drivers/displaylink). You can use up to six UGA-165s simultaneously on a Windows PC or up to four on a Mac. And you get the same support from Plugable to ensure your success with either product.

If you have questions on the UGA-165, post them below, and we’ll answer them as quickly as we can. Thanks again for being a great Plugable customer.

Plugable UGA-165 USB 2.0 to VGA/DVI/HDMI Graphics Adapter for Windows, Multiple Monitors up to 1920x1080 / 1600x1200... Product Details $39.95

2 thoughts on “UGA-165 Graphics Adapter Now $49.95”

  1. Hi
    I am seeking to use a 32″ HD 720P TV as my primary monitor because my eyes are going bad and its too hard to see on my 19″ computer monitor. Here is the TV I bought. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0073K645A/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00
    This TV accepts VGA and HDMI, but I was wondering if I could get more detail with your uga-165. Some places say VGA will work but HDMI will certainly give more clarity and detail. What is your opinion?

    Since my laptop only has VGA, your product seems suitable for converting to HDMI for 32″ HD TVs.
    Do you think converting it to HDMI and then sending it to the tv would be better than running it straight with VGA?

    Also my laptop resolution settings change depending upon what monitor is plugged in. My laptop native 16:9 15″ monitor only supports up to 1366 X 768 so that is why I ordered a HD tv 720P. I didnt think I could go up to 1080P.

    Now after the new tv is ordered and on its way, I just discovered when I plug in my 4:3 19″ external monitor I can adjust the resolution up to 1280 X 1024 which leads me to wonder I if had bought a 32″ 1080P tv, maybe I could support it. I can return the 720P tv unopened and exchange it for a 1080P tv for only $80- more. But the 1080P tv only supports HDMI and NOT vga. So for the 1080P Tv your product appears essential since my laptop only ouputs vga. Do you think a 1080P tv is a little better, or a lot better than a 720P tv for use as a primary daily monitor I will work on 8 hours a day?

    I am tempted to buy your product but if it does not perform better than straight VGA I would return it to Amazon which would do neither of us any good. So I believe your opinion on this matter would most likely be honest.

    There is a huge market out there for people wanting to use HD tvs as super large monitors. But you dont seem to be marketing for this niche segment. Instead you seem to be aiming at people that want multiple computer monitors without going HD tv way.

    Why?

    I am not after multiple monitors, but the ability to use a tv as a decent high quality 32″ monitor for my ailing vision.

    Are you missing out on the extra money of the HD tv niche market? Or do the HD tv’s not make good primary use monitors?

    Thanks for your time.
    Sincerely
    Chris

    1. Hi Chris – I’d recommend buying the 1080p TV (to future-proof it, since it’s such a big purchase), and then (as you describe) set the resolution lower until it looks good to your eyes. Windows also has settings to increase or decrease font size http://windows.microsoft.com/is-IS/windows7/Make-the-text-on-your-screen-larger-or-smaller which may help

      We don’t market our USB 2.0 generation graphics adapters for use with TVs, because the adapters are great for web and applications, but not recommended for motion video — and people typically want to play movies or TV shows from their PC onto the TV. The reason is both USB 2.0′s speed limits and the algorithm used by the USB 2.0 generation chips aren’t perfect for video.

      What’s interesting is the USB 3.0 generation chips (like in our USB3-HDMI-DVI http://plugable.com/products/usb3-hdmi-dvi/ ) have a double advantage in motion video performance: they have a better macroblock style encoding algorithm, and (if you have USB 3.0 on the PC), they have ample bandwidth. So with a fast enough CPU (we say dual core and 2GHz or better), the video quality is good.

      In your case, if you’re mostly using web and applications and have a fairly new Win7 PC, I’d recommend our USB-HDMI-DVI. Even for motion video, it will do ok too.

      The other alternative would be to get a 1080p TV that also supports VGA input, so you can use direct with your laptop. That would be a good route too.

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